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Communicating Corporate Ethics on the World Wid...
58,95 € *
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Communicating Corporate Ethics on the World Wide Web ab 58.95 € als Taschenbuch: A Discourse Analysis of Selected Company Web Sites. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Politik & Gesellschaft,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot
The Go Programming Language (eBook, PDF)
13,95 € *
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The Go Programming Language is the authoritative resource for any programmer who wants to learn Go. It shows how to write clear and idiomatic Go to solve real-world problems. The book does not assume prior knowledge of Go nor experience with any specific language, so you'll find it accessible whether you're most comfortable with JavaScript, Ruby, Python, Java, or C++. The first chapter is a tutorial on the basic concepts of Go, introduced through programs for file I/O and text processing, simple graphics, and web clients and servers. Early chapters cover the structural elements of Go programs: syntax, control flow, data types, and the organization of a program into packages, files, and functions. The examples illustrate many packages from the standard library and show how to create new ones of your own. Later chapters explain the package mechanism in more detail, and how to build, test, and maintain projects using the go tool. The chapters on methods and interfaces introduce Go's unconventional approach to object-oriented programming, in which methods can be declared on any type and interfaces are implicitly satisfied. They explain the key principles of encapsulation, composition, and substitutability using realistic examples. Two chapters on concurrency present in-depth approaches to this increasingly important topic. The first, which covers the basic mechanisms of goroutines and channels, illustrates the style known as communicating sequential processes for which Go is renowned. The second covers more traditional aspects of concurrency with shared variables. These chapters provide a solid foundation for programmers encountering concurrency for the first time. The final two chapters explore lower-level features of Go. One covers the art of metaprogramming using reflection. The other shows how to use the unsafe package to step outside the type system for special situations, and how to use the cgo tool to create Go bindings for C libraries. The book features hundreds of interesting and practical examples of well-written Go code that cover the whole language, its most important packages, and a wide range of applications. Each chapter has exercises to test your understanding and explore extensions and alternatives. Source code is freely available for download from and may be conveniently fetched, built, and installed using the go get command.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot
The Go Programming Language (eBook, PDF)
13,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The Go Programming Language is the authoritative resource for any programmer who wants to learn Go. It shows how to write clear and idiomatic Go to solve real-world problems. The book does not assume prior knowledge of Go nor experience with any specific language, so you'll find it accessible whether you're most comfortable with JavaScript, Ruby, Python, Java, or C++. The first chapter is a tutorial on the basic concepts of Go, introduced through programs for file I/O and text processing, simple graphics, and web clients and servers. Early chapters cover the structural elements of Go programs: syntax, control flow, data types, and the organization of a program into packages, files, and functions. The examples illustrate many packages from the standard library and show how to create new ones of your own. Later chapters explain the package mechanism in more detail, and how to build, test, and maintain projects using the go tool. The chapters on methods and interfaces introduce Go's unconventional approach to object-oriented programming, in which methods can be declared on any type and interfaces are implicitly satisfied. They explain the key principles of encapsulation, composition, and substitutability using realistic examples. Two chapters on concurrency present in-depth approaches to this increasingly important topic. The first, which covers the basic mechanisms of goroutines and channels, illustrates the style known as communicating sequential processes for which Go is renowned. The second covers more traditional aspects of concurrency with shared variables. These chapters provide a solid foundation for programmers encountering concurrency for the first time. The final two chapters explore lower-level features of Go. One covers the art of metaprogramming using reflection. The other shows how to use the unsafe package to step outside the type system for special situations, and how to use the cgo tool to create Go bindings for C libraries. The book features hundreds of interesting and practical examples of well-written Go code that cover the whole language, its most important packages, and a wide range of applications. Each chapter has exercises to test your understanding and explore extensions and alternatives. Source code is freely available for download from and may be conveniently fetched, built, and installed using the go get command.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot
The Little, Brown Handbook, Global Edition
52,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks – unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliabilityThe Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available–with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab™ not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts. Features + Benefits This title is a Pearson Global Edition. The Editorial team at Pearson has worked closely with educators around the world to include content which is especially relevant to students outside the United States. Accessibility and Ease of Use Authoritative and accessible coverage of the writing process, grammar, research, and documentation have made The Little, Brown Handbook one of the bestselling handbooks of all time. A clean, uncluttered page design uses color and type clearly to distinguish parts of the book and elements of the pages. Annotations on both visual and verbal examples connect principles and illustrations. Dictionary-style headers in the index make it easy to find entries, and helpful endpapers offer several paths to the book’s content. NEW! Streamlined explanations and new explanatory headings throughout make key information easier to find. Academic Writing NEW! A greatly expanded overview of common academic genres in the chapter on academic writing (now at the start of Part 2), such as responses, critical analyses, arguments, informative and personal writing, and research papers and reports, highlights key features of each genre and points students to examples in the handbook. NEW! A summary box titled “The writing situation” with each of the sample papers gives an overview of the situation to which the student responded–subject, purpose, audience, genre, and use of sources–thus connecting concepts with actual writing. NEW! Eighteen examples of academic writing in varied genres appear throughout the handbook, among them a new critical analysis of an advertisement and a new social-science research report documented in APA style. Synthesis receives special emphasis wherever students might need help balancing their own and others’ views, such as in responding to texts and visuals. NEW! The expanded chapter on critical reading and writing includes two full-length opinion pieces as exercises in critical reading, a new advertisement with a student’s analysis, a revised discussion of writing critically about texts and visuals, and a new critical analysis paper. Parts 9 and 10 give students a solid foundation in research writing and writing in the disciplines (literature, other humanities, social sciences, natural and applied sciences), along with extensive coverage of documentation in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! Key material on academic integrity in Chapter 6 on academic writing and Chapter 44 on plagiarism discusses developing one’s own perspective on a topic, using and managing sources, and avoiding plagiarism. Other chapters throughout the handbook reinforce these important topics. Research Writing and Documentation To help students develop their own perspectives on their research subjects, the text advises asking questions, entering into dialog with sources, and presenting multiple views fairly and responsibly. Extensive attention to research methods supports students in the early stages of research. The discussion of searching for and evaluating sources–library, Web, and social media–helps students to refine search terms and to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources. Case studies show the application of critical criteria to sample articles, Web documents, and a blog. NEW! A streamlined discussion of gathering information from sources stresses keeping accurate records of source material and marking borrowed words. Meticulous attention to research writing across the disciplines emphasizes managing information, using the library as a research gateway, evaluating and synthesizing sources, avoiding plagiarism, and documenting sources accurately. Students learn how to document and cite sources ethically in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! A chapter on documenting sources explains key features of source documentation, defines the relationship between in-text citations and a bibliography, and presents pros and cons of bibliography software. NEW! Updated, annotated samples of key source types illustrate MLA and APA documentation, showing students how to find the bibliographical information needed to cite each type and highlighting the similarities and differences between print and database sources. NEW! Reorganized chapters for all four styles group sources by type, thus simplifying the process of finding appropriate models and clarifying differences among print, database, Web, and other sources. NEW! A succinct guide accompanies the index to the models in each style to help students match their sources with appropriate citation formats. NEW! The chapter on CSE documentation reflects the new eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. NEW! A complete social-science research report shows APA style in the context of student writing. Two research papers illustrate MLA style and include a paper-in-progress, following a student through the research process and culminating in an annotated essay on green consumerism. The extensive chapter on avoiding plagiarism discusses deliberate and careless plagiarism, shows examples of plagiarized and revised sentences, and gives updated advice about avoiding plagiarism with online sources. Writing As a Process NEW! A reorganized presentation of drafting, revising, and editing distinguishes revising more clearly as a step separate from editing. NEW! An expanded discussion of thesis covers using the thesis statement to preview organization. NEW! New, relevant examples in Chapter 4 on paragraphs illustrate important concepts of coherence, organization, and development. NEW! A revised and streamlined chapter on presenting writing focuses on essential information related to document design, visuals and other media, writing for online environments, and oral presentations. NEW! A revised discussion of preparing a writing portfolio gives an overview of common formats and requirements. Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation NEW! Revised explanations of grammar concepts and rules throughout simplify the presentation and emphasize key material. NEW! Two common trouble spots—sentence fragments and passive voice—are discussed in greater detail and illustrated with new and more examples. NEW! Dozens of new and revised examples and exercises clarify and test important concepts. NEW! Added examples in Part 8 on effective words show common shortcuts of texting and other electronic communication and how to revise them for academic writing. Visual and Media Literacy Thorough discussions of critically reading advertisements, graphs, and other visuals appear in Chapter 7 on critical reading, Chapter 8 on reading arguments, and Chapter 43 on working with sources. NEW! A student work-in-progress illustrates the process of analyzing an advertisement and culminates in a sample critical analysis. NEW! Updated and detailed help with preparing or finding illustrations appears in Chapter 5 on presenting writing and Chapter Preface for Students: Using This Book Preface for Instructors PART 1: The Process of Writing 1. Assessing the Writing Situation a. Understanding how writing happens b. Analyzing the writing situation c. Discovering and limiting a subject d. Defining a purpose e. Considering the audience f. Understanding genres 2. Discovering and Shaping Ideas a. Discovering ideas b. Developing a thesis c. Organizing ideas SAMPLE INFORMATIVE ESSAY 3. Drafting, Revising, and Editing a. Writing the first draft b. Revising a draft c. Giving and receiving comments d. Examining a sample revision e. Editing the revised draft f. Preparing and proofreading the final draft g. SAMPLE FINAL DRAFT (RESPONSE ESSAY) h. Preparing a writing portfolio 4. Writing and Revising Paragraphs a. Relating paragraphs in the essay b. Maintaining paragraph unity c. Achieving paragraph coherence d. Developing the paragraph e. Writing special kinds of paragraphs 5. Presenting Writing a. Formatting academic writing SAMPLE MARKETING REPORT b. Using visuals and other media in multimodal writing c. Presenting writing on the Web SAMPLE WEB SITE SAMPLE LITERACY NARRATIVE POSTED TO A BLOG d. Making oral presentations SAMPLE POWERPOINT SLIDES PART 2: Reading and Writing in and out of College 6. Writing in Academic Situations a. Determining purpose and audienceb. Using an academic genrec. Choosing structure and content d. Using sources with integritye. Using academic language f. Communicating with instructors and classmates 7. Critical Reading and Writing a. Using techniques of critical reading b. Summarizing c. Developing a critical response d. Viewing visuals critically e. Writing criticallyf. Examining sample critical analyses SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF A TEXT SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF AN IMAGE 8. Reading Arguments Critically a. Recognizing the elements of argument b. Testing claims c. Weighing evidence d. Discovering assumptions e. Watching language, hearing tone f. Judging reasonableness g. Recognizing fallacies h. Reading visual arguments 9. Writing an Argument a. Finding a subject b. Conceiving a thesis statement c. Analyzing your purpose and your audience d. Using reason e. Using evidence f. Reaching your readers g. Organizing your argument h. Revising your argument i. SAMPLE PROPOSAL ARGUMENT 10. Taking Essay Exams a. Preparing for an essay examination b. Planning your time and your answer c. Starting the essay d. Developing the essay e. Rereading the essay 11. Public Writing a. Writing on social media b. Writing business letters and memos SAMPLE LETTER AND MEMO c. Writing a job application SAMPLE LETTER AND RESUMES d. Writing business reports and proposals SAMPLE REPORT AND PROPOSAL e. Writing for community work SAMPLE NEWSLETTER, ONLINE POST PART 3: Grammatical Sentences 12. Understanding Sentence Grammar a. Understanding the basic sentence b. Expanding the basic sentence with single words c. Expanding the basic sentence with word groups d. Compounding words, phrases, and clauses e. Changing the usual word order f. Classifying sentences 13. Case of Nouns and Pronouns a. Compound subjects and complements b. Compound objects c. We or us with a noun d. Appositives e. Pronoun after than or as in a comparison f. Subjects and objects of infinitives g. Who vs. whom h. Case before a gerund 14. Verbs Verb Forms a. Regular and irregular verbs b. Sit and set; lie and lay; rise and raise c. Omitted -s and -ed endings d. Helping verbs e. Verb plus gerund or infinitive f. Verb plus participle Tense g. Appropriate tense for meaning h. Sequence of tenses Mood i. Subjunctive verb forms Voice j. Active vs. passive voice 15. Agreement a. Agreement between subject and verb b. Agreement between pronoun and antecedent 16. Adjectives and Adverbs a. Adjectives only with nouns and pronouns b. Adjectives after linking verbs c. Adjectives with objects; adverbs with verbs d. Comparative and superlative forms e. Double negatives f. Overuse of nouns as modifiers g. Present and past participles as adjectives h. A, an, the, and other determiners PART 4: Clear Sentences 17. Sentence Fragments a. Tests for sentence completeness, revision of fragments b. Subordinate clause c. Verbal or prepositional phrase d. Other fragments e. Acceptable uses of incomplete sentences 18. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences a. Main clauses not joined by coordinating conjunction b. Main clauses related by a conjunctive adverb or transitional expression c. Main clauses with no conjunction or punctuation 19. Pronoun Reference a. Clear reference to one antecedent b. Clear placement of pronoun and antecedent c. Reference to specific antecedent d. Indefinite use of you e. Clear use of it f. Appropriate who, which, that 20. Shifts a. Person and number b. Tense and mood c. Subject and voice d. Indirect and direct quotations and questions 21. Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers a.For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks - unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliability The Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available-with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab(TM) not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot
The Little, Brown Handbook, Global Edition
52,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks – unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliabilityThe Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available–with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab™ not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts. Features + Benefits This title is a Pearson Global Edition. The Editorial team at Pearson has worked closely with educators around the world to include content which is especially relevant to students outside the United States. Accessibility and Ease of Use Authoritative and accessible coverage of the writing process, grammar, research, and documentation have made The Little, Brown Handbook one of the bestselling handbooks of all time. A clean, uncluttered page design uses color and type clearly to distinguish parts of the book and elements of the pages. Annotations on both visual and verbal examples connect principles and illustrations. Dictionary-style headers in the index make it easy to find entries, and helpful endpapers offer several paths to the book’s content. NEW! Streamlined explanations and new explanatory headings throughout make key information easier to find. Academic Writing NEW! A greatly expanded overview of common academic genres in the chapter on academic writing (now at the start of Part 2), such as responses, critical analyses, arguments, informative and personal writing, and research papers and reports, highlights key features of each genre and points students to examples in the handbook. NEW! A summary box titled “The writing situation” with each of the sample papers gives an overview of the situation to which the student responded–subject, purpose, audience, genre, and use of sources–thus connecting concepts with actual writing. NEW! Eighteen examples of academic writing in varied genres appear throughout the handbook, among them a new critical analysis of an advertisement and a new social-science research report documented in APA style. Synthesis receives special emphasis wherever students might need help balancing their own and others’ views, such as in responding to texts and visuals. NEW! The expanded chapter on critical reading and writing includes two full-length opinion pieces as exercises in critical reading, a new advertisement with a student’s analysis, a revised discussion of writing critically about texts and visuals, and a new critical analysis paper. Parts 9 and 10 give students a solid foundation in research writing and writing in the disciplines (literature, other humanities, social sciences, natural and applied sciences), along with extensive coverage of documentation in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! Key material on academic integrity in Chapter 6 on academic writing and Chapter 44 on plagiarism discusses developing one’s own perspective on a topic, using and managing sources, and avoiding plagiarism. Other chapters throughout the handbook reinforce these important topics. Research Writing and Documentation To help students develop their own perspectives on their research subjects, the text advises asking questions, entering into dialog with sources, and presenting multiple views fairly and responsibly. Extensive attention to research methods supports students in the early stages of research. The discussion of searching for and evaluating sources–library, Web, and social media–helps students to refine search terms and to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources. Case studies show the application of critical criteria to sample articles, Web documents, and a blog. NEW! A streamlined discussion of gathering information from sources stresses keeping accurate records of source material and marking borrowed words. Meticulous attention to research writing across the disciplines emphasizes managing information, using the library as a research gateway, evaluating and synthesizing sources, avoiding plagiarism, and documenting sources accurately. Students learn how to document and cite sources ethically in MLA, Chicago, APA, and CSE styles. NEW! A chapter on documenting sources explains key features of source documentation, defines the relationship between in-text citations and a bibliography, and presents pros and cons of bibliography software. NEW! Updated, annotated samples of key source types illustrate MLA and APA documentation, showing students how to find the bibliographical information needed to cite each type and highlighting the similarities and differences between print and database sources. NEW! Reorganized chapters for all four styles group sources by type, thus simplifying the process of finding appropriate models and clarifying differences among print, database, Web, and other sources. NEW! A succinct guide accompanies the index to the models in each style to help students match their sources with appropriate citation formats. NEW! The chapter on CSE documentation reflects the new eighth edition of Scientific Style and Format: The CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers. NEW! A complete social-science research report shows APA style in the context of student writing. Two research papers illustrate MLA style and include a paper-in-progress, following a student through the research process and culminating in an annotated essay on green consumerism. The extensive chapter on avoiding plagiarism discusses deliberate and careless plagiarism, shows examples of plagiarized and revised sentences, and gives updated advice about avoiding plagiarism with online sources. Writing As a Process NEW! A reorganized presentation of drafting, revising, and editing distinguishes revising more clearly as a step separate from editing. NEW! An expanded discussion of thesis covers using the thesis statement to preview organization. NEW! New, relevant examples in Chapter 4 on paragraphs illustrate important concepts of coherence, organization, and development. NEW! A revised and streamlined chapter on presenting writing focuses on essential information related to document design, visuals and other media, writing for online environments, and oral presentations. NEW! A revised discussion of preparing a writing portfolio gives an overview of common formats and requirements. Usage, Grammar, and Punctuation NEW! Revised explanations of grammar concepts and rules throughout simplify the presentation and emphasize key material. NEW! Two common trouble spots—sentence fragments and passive voice—are discussed in greater detail and illustrated with new and more examples. NEW! Dozens of new and revised examples and exercises clarify and test important concepts. NEW! Added examples in Part 8 on effective words show common shortcuts of texting and other electronic communication and how to revise them for academic writing. Visual and Media Literacy Thorough discussions of critically reading advertisements, graphs, and other visuals appear in Chapter 7 on critical reading, Chapter 8 on reading arguments, and Chapter 43 on working with sources. NEW! A student work-in-progress illustrates the process of analyzing an advertisement and culminates in a sample critical analysis. NEW! Updated and detailed help with preparing or finding illustrations appears in Chapter 5 on presenting writing and Chapter Preface for Students: Using This Book Preface for Instructors PART 1: The Process of Writing 1. Assessing the Writing Situation a. Understanding how writing happens b. Analyzing the writing situation c. Discovering and limiting a subject d. Defining a purpose e. Considering the audience f. Understanding genres 2. Discovering and Shaping Ideas a. Discovering ideas b. Developing a thesis c. Organizing ideas SAMPLE INFORMATIVE ESSAY 3. Drafting, Revising, and Editing a. Writing the first draft b. Revising a draft c. Giving and receiving comments d. Examining a sample revision e. Editing the revised draft f. Preparing and proofreading the final draft g. SAMPLE FINAL DRAFT (RESPONSE ESSAY) h. Preparing a writing portfolio 4. Writing and Revising Paragraphs a. Relating paragraphs in the essay b. Maintaining paragraph unity c. Achieving paragraph coherence d. Developing the paragraph e. Writing special kinds of paragraphs 5. Presenting Writing a. Formatting academic writing SAMPLE MARKETING REPORT b. Using visuals and other media in multimodal writing c. Presenting writing on the Web SAMPLE WEB SITE SAMPLE LITERACY NARRATIVE POSTED TO A BLOG d. Making oral presentations SAMPLE POWERPOINT SLIDES PART 2: Reading and Writing in and out of College 6. Writing in Academic Situations a. Determining purpose and audienceb. Using an academic genrec. Choosing structure and content d. Using sources with integritye. Using academic language f. Communicating with instructors and classmates 7. Critical Reading and Writing a. Using techniques of critical reading b. Summarizing c. Developing a critical response d. Viewing visuals critically e. Writing criticallyf. Examining sample critical analyses SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF A TEXT SAMPLE CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF AN IMAGE 8. Reading Arguments Critically a. Recognizing the elements of argument b. Testing claims c. Weighing evidence d. Discovering assumptions e. Watching language, hearing tone f. Judging reasonableness g. Recognizing fallacies h. Reading visual arguments 9. Writing an Argument a. Finding a subject b. Conceiving a thesis statement c. Analyzing your purpose and your audience d. Using reason e. Using evidence f. Reaching your readers g. Organizing your argument h. Revising your argument i. SAMPLE PROPOSAL ARGUMENT 10. Taking Essay Exams a. Preparing for an essay examination b. Planning your time and your answer c. Starting the essay d. Developing the essay e. Rereading the essay 11. Public Writing a. Writing on social media b. Writing business letters and memos SAMPLE LETTER AND MEMO c. Writing a job application SAMPLE LETTER AND RESUMES d. Writing business reports and proposals SAMPLE REPORT AND PROPOSAL e. Writing for community work SAMPLE NEWSLETTER, ONLINE POST PART 3: Grammatical Sentences 12. Understanding Sentence Grammar a. Understanding the basic sentence b. Expanding the basic sentence with single words c. Expanding the basic sentence with word groups d. Compounding words, phrases, and clauses e. Changing the usual word order f. Classifying sentences 13. Case of Nouns and Pronouns a. Compound subjects and complements b. Compound objects c. We or us with a noun d. Appositives e. Pronoun after than or as in a comparison f. Subjects and objects of infinitives g. Who vs. whom h. Case before a gerund 14. Verbs Verb Forms a. Regular and irregular verbs b. Sit and set; lie and lay; rise and raise c. Omitted -s and -ed endings d. Helping verbs e. Verb plus gerund or infinitive f. Verb plus participle Tense g. Appropriate tense for meaning h. Sequence of tenses Mood i. Subjunctive verb forms Voice j. Active vs. passive voice 15. Agreement a. Agreement between subject and verb b. Agreement between pronoun and antecedent 16. Adjectives and Adverbs a. Adjectives only with nouns and pronouns b. Adjectives after linking verbs c. Adjectives with objects; adverbs with verbs d. Comparative and superlative forms e. Double negatives f. Overuse of nouns as modifiers g. Present and past participles as adjectives h. A, an, the, and other determiners PART 4: Clear Sentences 17. Sentence Fragments a. Tests for sentence completeness, revision of fragments b. Subordinate clause c. Verbal or prepositional phrase d. Other fragments e. Acceptable uses of incomplete sentences 18. Comma Splices and Fused Sentences a. Main clauses not joined by coordinating conjunction b. Main clauses related by a conjunctive adverb or transitional expression c. Main clauses with no conjunction or punctuation 19. Pronoun Reference a. Clear reference to one antecedent b. Clear placement of pronoun and antecedent c. Reference to specific antecedent d. Indefinite use of you e. Clear use of it f. Appropriate who, which, that 20. Shifts a. Person and number b. Tense and mood c. Subject and voice d. Indirect and direct quotations and questions 21. Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers a.For courses in English Composition. The gold standard of handbooks - unmatched in accuracy, currency, and reliability The Little, Brown Handbook is an essential reference tool and classroom resource designed to help students find the answers they need quickly and easily. While keeping pace with rapid changes in writing and its teaching, it offers the most comprehensive research and documentation available-with grammar coverage that is second to none. With detailed discussions of critical reading, media literacy, academic writing, and argument, as well as writing as a process, writing in the disciplines, and writing beyond the classroom, this handbook addresses writers of varying experience and in varying fields. MyWritingLab(TM) not included. Students, if MyWritingLab is a recommended/mandatory component of the course, please ask your instructor for the correct ISBN and course ID. MyWritingLab should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information. MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment product designed to personalize learning and improve results. With a wide range of interactive, engaging, and assignable activities, students are encouraged to actively learn and retain tough course concepts.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Communicating Corporate Ethics on the World Wid...
58,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Communicating Corporate Ethics on the World Wide Web ab 58.95 EURO A Discourse Analysis of Selected Company Web Sites

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 10.12.2019
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Connect Online: Web Learning Adventures
139,00 CHF *
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'New!' Introduce yourself to Jay, Peg, and their spotted dog, Link, in Glencoe's new computer education textbook, 'Connect Online: Web Learning Adventures.' 'Connect Online' introduces students to the Internet through the use of hands-on activities and by visiting various websites. Students are introduced to the various tools and methods for communicating and researching on the Internet and World Wide Web. They also learn to explore the Internet through integrated activities in math, science, global studies, language arts, and other topics.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.12.2019
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Communicating Corporate Ethics on the World Wid...
83,90 CHF *
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Spanning the fields of corporate communication and corporate ethics, this book investigates how companies communicate their ethical stance on their web sites. The study integrates the findings of six case studies, including BellSouth, Lockheed Martin, Ben & Jerry's, McDonald's, Nike and Levi Strauss. This sample offers both typicality and systematic variety, as all of the six companies are in need of presenting themselves as ethical business players but belong to three different ethics paradigms. Despite this variation, their communicative strategies are quite similar regarding content choice, self-presentation, stakeholder address and the hypertextual organization of their messages. Contents: Business Ethics vs. Corporate Social Responsibility - The Business-Ethics Paradigm - The Corporate-Social-Responsibility Paradigm - The BE & CSR Paradigm - Cross-Case Analysis.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.12.2019
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Bootstrapping Trust in Modern Computers
68,90 CHF *
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Trusting a computer for a security-sensitive task (such as checking email or banking online) requires the user to know something about the computer's state. We examine research on securely capturing a computer's state, and consider the utility of this information both for improving security on the local computer (e.g., to convince the user that her computer is not infected with malware) and for communicating a remote computer's state (e.g., to enable the user to check that a web server will adequately protect her data). Although the recent 'Trusted Computing' initiative has drawn both positive and negative attention to this area, we consider the older and broader topic of bootstrapping trust in a computer. We cover issues ranging from the wide collection of secure hardware that can serve as a foundation for trust, to the usability issues that arise when trying to convey computer state information to humans. This approach unifies disparate research efforts and highlights opportunities for additional work that can guide real-world improvements in computer security.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.12.2019
Zum Angebot